Column: Tiger Woods wins Masters, completes the re-birth of a legend

By Nick Archacki, news editor

The Masters is undoubtedly the most anticipated event of the year on the PGA Tour. The best golfers from around the world earn their way to the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia with the hopes of walking away with the famed green jacket.

Before the 2019 Masters started, unsurprisingly, the sports world was buzzing about Tiger Woods, arguably one of the greatest golfers to ever play the game.

Of course, there were many questions surrounding the living legend. Where would he place? Would he make the cut? Would he place in the top ten, top five? Would he win?

These speculations arose due to a magnitude of roadblocks Tiger has faced in the past ten years in his personal life and golfing career. Through that time, Woods has dealt with sports critics and long-time golf enthusiasts who said he would never win a tournament again.

However, in Tiger-like fashion, he made the critics eat their words. He brought in the crowd and fans like it was 1997 when he won his first Masters at age 21. He played the Masters like it was 2005 when he won his fourth Masters.

After all of the pain, agony, defeat, doubt, and criticism the icon has faced since 2008, Tiger has thoroughly made golf whole again with his most recent comeback. Finally, after 11 years without winning a major, the 43-year-old, who had four back surgeries in a span of four years, won his fifteenth major title, the 2019 Masters, his fifth Masters.

His Masters win ended the longest drought between Masters titles in golf history, 14 years. Woods is now second for the most wins in Masters history, behind Jack Nicklaus. On a side note, Woods is chasing Nicklaus for the most major titles in golf history; Jack has 18 major wins to Tiger’s 15 major wins.

When Woods sunk his two-foot putt on the 72nd hole of the tournament, he clenched his fist, picked his ball up, and let out a roar to the berserk crowd with both hands in the air, holding the putter that has won Woods 14 of his 15 majors.

Woods walked off the green straight to his family; yelling, shouting, and embracing the historical moment. He won a major in front of his kids and a new generation of golfers for the first time in his life. In an interview, Woods said, “to have my kids there, it’s come full circle. My dad was here in ’97, and now I’m the dad with two kids there.”

As a long-time golfer and Tiger Woods fan, for me to watch him win a major, acknowledge the importance of it, and remember it, I can’t express how elated I was when he knocked his final putt into the hole. I think everyone who’s involved with sports was happy to see Tiger win this tournament and watch his comeback become a perfect ending. This victory is without a doubt the greatest comeback in golf history.

Six-time NBA champion, Michael Jordan, shared his thoughts on Tiger’s victory and return to golf immortality. “To me, it was the greatest comeback I’ve ever seen,” Jordan said. “He [Woods] had to change his game; he had to change his perspective a little bit. They [Woods’ tour opponents] got problems. You don’t know what Tiger’s capable of doing.”         

Eldrick Tont “Tiger” Woods, without exception, is one of the greatest athletes to ever live. For golf, he is the Michael Jordan of basketball; he is the Michael Phelps of swimming; he is the Muhammad Ali of boxing. Woods will be remembered for bringing youth, vibrancy, fans, and excitement to golf. Tiger changed the sport from a formal game to an exhilarating one.

Woods will also be remembered for his comeback and trek back to the top of the golf world. Woods said that he was “completely done with golf” two years ago. Nonetheless, you can’t kill a champion, especially when that champion’s job isn’t finished, even if he couldn’t tie his shoes two years ago.

With his performance in the 2019 Masters, he showed everyone that if you put your mind to your passion and never give up, you can achieve your goal. Tiger is now on the hunt, again, in chasing Sam Snead for the most wins in PGA Tour history. Snead has 82 victories to Woods’ 81.

On May 6, Woods received the highest honor any American civilian can acquire. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Trump for his courageous fight to make it back to the winners circle on the toughest stage in golf. Woods is now the fourth golfer ever to receive the award with predecessors Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer, and Charlie Sifford being the other recipients.

The question now stands, will one of the greatest golfers, if not the greatest, of all-time achieve 82 wins? I think yes… I think he will get more. Will Woods win the most majors in history? Possibly. I do believe, however, that Tiger will tie Jack Nicklaus at 18 major championships.

Track and field: DeYoung headed to districts

By Mason McClure, staff writer

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Senior runner Gabe DeYoung

The Track and Field team traveled to Franklin on Saturday, April 13, where eight runners participated in various track events. Senior runner, Gabe DeYoung, qualified for the District 10 championship, which will take place at Slippery Rock University on May 18, in the 1600 meter race with a time of 4:46:41 and the 3200 meter with a time of 10:33:44. Gabe finished sixth in 3200 and ninth in 1600.

Club adviser William Hetrick said, “Overall, I was very proud of all of athletes who ran, and having Gabe qualify in both events already is exciting as it is his senior year.” 

After competing at Franklin, the runners traveled to Hermitage, where both Gabe DeYoung and Paige Fuller, a freshman runner,  beat their own personal records in the 3200. “It was a goal to do better and improve,” Fuller said. DeYoung agreed: “I’ve been trying to break my own record of 10:30 for a long time. It’s nice to finally be under that time.”

Hetrick expressed his appreciation for the Track Club, “We have ten members who run; it’s not an approved sport so members cannot receive letters but they volunteer to run and better themselves,” Hetrick said. “I think it’s great they run for their benefit as opposed to just running to receive a letter.”

The team also ran at Oil City at the Oil Country Invitational on May 4. Gabe DeYoung took first place in the boys 1600 with a time of 4:42.92, a personal best. He also took first in the boys 3200 in a time of 10:26.78, also a personal best. The team has two races this week one today and one Thursday at Meadville Area High School.

 

                                       

Anderson speaks powerfully in her new book “Shout”

 

by Sam Shelenberger, Broadcast Director

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Shelenberger read SHOUT for his locker lit display. 

Nearly two decades after publishing her critically acclaimed novel “Speak,” author Laurie Halse Anderson has published a memoir written in free-verse poetry titled “Shout.”

The book delves into the mind of Anderson and the trials and tribulations she’s faced in life. Covering everything from having a father with PTSD to being raped at thirteen, Anderson does not hold back. She empowers her audience to speak against injustice in the world.

Overall, the book was incredibly moving. Her anecdotes may help those who have experienced sexual abuse to be empowered, and it allowed those who are naive to realize the heinous crimes some people have committed.

The use of free-verse poetry to convey her point was effective as there were fewer words distracting the audience. Her use of colorful figurative language made the book much more enjoyable and gave power to her message. 

 

Saegertown teachers saddle up for ‘Donkey Basketball’

By Bree Snyder, staff writer

For a second year, teachers from Saegertown will face off against Maplewood in a game of donkey basketball. Principal Tom Baker, teachers Phil Young, Chris Greco, Kelli Peters, Kathleen Mattera, Shannon Stewart, Rose Baker, Brian Hanley, and cafeteria worker Memory Irwin will compete on behalf of SES and SHS.

Exactly as the name suggests, players from both schools will be seated on the backs of donkeys (provided by Buckeye Donkey Ball) while attempting to shoot hoops and score points for their respective teams.  

According to Maplewood PTO co-president Jenna Barickman, all proceeds will be split between the Maplewood Parent-Teacher Organization (PTO) and the Saegertown PTO. A Chinese Auction and raffle tickets will also be available for purchase.

“I’m looking forward to having fun,” Mr. Greco said. “I have friends from Maplewood, so I know it will be all in good fun.”

The action will begin at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 23 in the Maplewood High School gymnasium. Entrance fees are $6 for advanced admission and $8 for gate admission. Children under six are free with paid adult admission.

For more information, you can email barickfam@gmail.com or call (814) 337-1659.

Saegertown Students dance their way to blue ribbons at the PA Farm Show

By Sam Shelenberger, broadcast director

On January 7, students from Saegertown High School traveled to the Pennsylvania State Farm Show in Harrisburg to compete in the Square Dance Competition for the ninth consecutive year.

Saegertown students brought home blue ribbons in the square dance competition from the 103rd PA Farm Show.

Seniors Seth Lang, Ben Shelenberger, juniors Nathan Barner, Sam Shelenberger, Marli McGowan, Emily Barr and sophomore Amanda Crowl are all members of the ‘Wild Country Dancers’ club.

“My favorite part is being out there on the floor at Farm Show with all of my friends,” said Crowl, who has been square dancing for four years. “I like dancing with my friends, and our instructors make it fun.”

The square dance team is instructed by Brenda Schmidt and Don Yosten. Starting in October, the club meets every Sunday at the VFW to practice. This year, the songs the club danced to were “Wagon Wheel,“ “Just Keep Rolling Along,” “Fancy Free,” “The Best is Yet to Come,” and “Write Your Name in the Sand.”

“The hardest part was taking the time to learn the new calls,” said five year veteran Emily Barr. “It wasn’t too hard because Brenda and Don are excellent instructors.”

Each of the seven SHS students received a blue ribbon, and are eager to return to the floor. “I can’t wait for next year,” Crowl said. “I’m ready to see what awaits us.”

Opinion: Adding clubs creates opportunity for students to connect

By Samantha Thomas, staff writer

After school clubs have served as a way to improve confidence and employability in ways that most things cannot. Not only do clubs teach about teamwork, but they make it easier to make and keep good friends. I believe that by joining clubs you can improve time management, build respect, and avoid risky behaviors.

I recently asked the students of Saegertown what new clubs they think we should have. Junior Logan Gage said, “We should have a Dungeons and Dragons club. It’s a great way to get away from stress at school and the world.” Gage isn’t the only one with that idea. Junior Casey Jackson agreed on the importance of having a place to game: “We should have a gaming club for the people who need to unwind and do something they enjoy.”

Senior Lexxi Frye thinks a photography club would be a great place to learn photography and photo editing. “There are a lot of people who join yearbook specifically for the photography aspect,” Frye said.

A student who asked to remain anonymous voiced, “We need a gay alliance club. I notice a lot of people struggling with their identity as members of the LGBT community.”

It is important for teenagers to be able to meet and communicate with people with the same uncertainties, beliefs, and hobbies. It’s nice to know you’re not alone when you are living in such a small and fairly secluded area where it’s easy to feel like an outcast.

Creating clubs can change that or at least make it easier to find friends and hobbies. I strongly believe that more after-school clubs would benefit the students of Saegertown in unique and incredible ways.

French Creek Community Theater packs the house at Disney World

 

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Saegertown students Dustin Steiger, Rachel White, and Blake Hamilton performed at Disney with a group from French Creek Community Theater over the Thanksgiving break.

By Dustin Steiger, Arts and Entertainment Editor

Roughly six months ago, the student performers of French Creek Community Theatre (FCCT) began training for “Team Disney 2018,” a special opportunity to perform as a show choir on Saturday, November 24 at Disney Springs. The young actors and actresses involved with FCCT were more than excited to show Orlando what they had. As Thanksgiving Break began, the students, including  Saegertown students Blake Hamilton, Rachel White, and myself, made their way to Florida.

As a proud FCCT performer myself, I can personally say that the experience was absolutely exhilarating. The group arrived and checked into Disney’s All-Star Music Resort a couple days before the performance, which gave us a couple days to get familiar with the parks and to explore. On Friday, November 23, the group attended two “Workshop” sessions, which gave us the opportunity to discover the process that Disney performers and voice actors go through first-hand.

For the first workshop, we learned and performed a dance routine for the Disney song “I Have a Dream,” and for the second workshop, we recorded voice-overs using footage from the Disney movie “Frozen.” While exploring the parks and attending the workshops were certainly amazing, the real highlight of the trip came from the Team Disney 2018 performance on Saturday.

With the hot sun beating down on us, we arrived at the Marketplace Stage in Disney Springs and crowded backstage, where we waited anxiously. After the group said a quick prayer, we were introduced by the announcer and walked on stage to find the seats filled, with a large number of people standing behind the seats in order to watch. With every song we performed came rounds of applause and smiles from the audience. The show lasted about a half an hour, with the group performing fourteen total songs, including popular Disney tunes such as “The Circle of Life,” “I Just Can’t Wait to be King,” and “Colors of the Wind,” as well as a few Broadway hits, such as “One Short Day” from the musical Wicked and “Seasons of Love” from the musical Rent.

“I one-hundred percent won’t (forget this),” said Jonathan Merritt, FCCT performer and a former Saegertown Panther. “(These are the) best years of my life.”

“This theatre is my family,” said Rachel White, “and I can always count on them. I will always remember the adventures.”