‘State of the Art’ technology fuels future success

By Mason McClure, staff writer

Monday through Sunday, night and day, Saegertown students use their electronics and technology for homework and in-school assignments. Technology is everywhere; it’s entwined into almost every aspect of our culture.

Junior Josh McWright adjusts the battery on a bot for the RoboBots competition.

Using technology in the classroom gives teachers the opportunity to develop their students’ digital skills. It’s one thing to use electronic devices; it’s another thing to know how to use them correctly and responsibly.

Newer electronics and machinery are essential for modern-day careers, so it only makes sense that our schools should have them too. In classes like Robotics, Wood Tech, and Tech Education, students are taught how to properly use modern technology. Students choose electives like these to expand their knowledge, or even to help themselves pursue long-term goals.

According to an article from securedgenetworks.com, “If used correctly, mobile devices and the applications they support, will help prepare students for their future careers.”

Robotics teacher Mr. Nahay emphasizes that, generally, schools should invest more funding into modern advancements and machinery, “Students need experience using modern technology, comparable to technology in workplaces,” he said.

Junior Zane Schlosser, a robotics student, shared his input about the importance of technology in school: “I think technology should be utilized in every subject for school. It can help you prepare for the workforce. Any career you decide, technology will be a huge factor.”

Students and faculty members should have more input on the school’s investment into these advancements. “You have to continually invest in technology,” said Mrs. Stacey Hetrick, journalism advisor and English teacher. “I appreciate the iPad initiative, but I hope the district will continue to invest in computers. I also wish the district would reinstate the ‘bring your own device’ program.”

Schlosser hopes the district will continue to make cutting-edge technology a priority: “The closer to state of the art, the better. When entering the workforce, you will be using newer technology. If our school decided to invest in more advanced technology, we would have a better look into possible future careers.”

TEK4S comes to SHS

By Emily Johnson, Director of Marketing

Technology is an ever growing educational tool, and it can be difficult to use. Here at Saegertown, a hidden gem called TEK4S helps with just that. The program has been functioning for eight years. It is run by Mr. Nick Paolini, and, in his Prezi, he describes TEK4S’s mission. “Participants will acquire and hone 21st century skills essential to learning while fostering the use of emerging technologies to strengthen the pedagogical practices of educators within their districts,” he said. Mr. Jeff Patrick, the adviser of TEK4S, works with several students: eighth graders Mikayla Balog and Will Phelan, and seventh grade students Megan Murphy and Josh Weaver. All four students were nominated by teachers to be in the club.

“It’s a jumpstart for kids interested in technology,” said seventh grader Josh Weaver. It introduces seventh and eighth grade students with newly developed technology, but there is a twist; the students attend meetings at the intermediate unit 5 in Edinboro. While at IU5, they’re assigned an education oriented application. Then the students, back at the school, make presentations to share at IU5, and teach their teachers how to use the apps. They explore three apps and complete three presentations per year. Their final project, if satisfactory, can make it to the state level. The students also participate in activities in order to receive prizes. Unfortunately this is the last year for TEK4S due to state level budget cuts, but it has supported our school for years.